Francis Darroze 1991 Domaine de Dupont

Here you can talk about the experiences with the different brands and/or types of Armagnac.
numen
VSOP-Cognac
VSOP-Cognac
Posts: 629
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2012 1:52 am

Francis Darroze 1991 Domaine de Dupont

Postby numen » Mon Aug 27, 2012 10:30 pm

As I venture through my open bottles, trying to finish them off while also doing a more thorough job taking notes, I move to the 1991 Domaine de Dupont, with Francis Darroze as the negociant. I got this bottle by mistake (the store, not mine), but I was hard-pressed to turn down a nice little bottle shipped from France, so I kept it and re-ordered the other bottles. Mr Darroze, who clearly understands the spirit and consumers' interest in knowing what they're having, states on the label that it's 20 years old, and bottled in September 2011 (48%). Goodness, have I really gone through so much already? C'est la vie.

Domaine de Pounon 1991 20 Years.jpg
Domaine de Pounon 1991 20 Years.jpg (98.19 KiB) Viewed 1096 times


Nose: Rather on apricots and flowers (honeyed orange blossom). There's a trace of sawdust, with some oiled wood left on the block in the woodshop. I also get some candied almonds, with a thick honey syrup rather than just sugar. Citrus fruit, but without the acidity - perhaps tangerine? With time, the apricot turns into a split of candied apricot and sugar-crystalized apricot and the baked rolls come out a bit more, too.

Palate: Cool and silky, and medium-full bodied. The alcohol is kept in check on entry, and comes out a bit with a bit of the heat mid-palate. Definitely apricot and very soft, barely-dried figs. There's a honey-buttery quality there, but it's in the back and verging on the...

Finish: Yes, there's slightly more baked goods, but fruit-centered, like a peach and apricot cobbler. The nuttiness is there and maybe a bit drier than almonds, more like walnuts. Dried fruit mix (like those bags of slightly sweetened chopped/diced dried fruit). As the fruit gives way, there is a pie-crust like feel with the combination of sugar, bread, and that slight bitterness, but ever so slight.

I haven't had it in a while, and, looking back at my notes, I think that I had most of the right stuff in it. Still, it highlights for me how what we taste can be affected by so many factors. Last time, the baked good/brioche quality was much more distinct and apparent, and so, when considering what to have, I viewed this in the 'sweet baked goods' rather than 'dried fruit' category. This time around, it was noticeably more about the fruit, and apricot in particular rather than non-descript dried fruit. All the same, this falls into the realm of extremely good, readily accessible, and lots of fun. A fairly standard Darroze bottling in that qualitative sense. There's not much obvious wood in it, just a little bit on the nose and some of the finish, so it's really just hitting the sweet-spot for ageing. Grading this out, it's probably somewhere between a B+ and A-.

BSinTX
VSOP-Cognac
VSOP-Cognac
Posts: 494
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 2:52 am

Re: Francis Darroze 1991 Domaine de Dupont

Postby BSinTX » Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:31 pm

Awesome review!! At what age do you usually consider armagnac to be best for you?

numen
VSOP-Cognac
VSOP-Cognac
Posts: 629
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2012 1:52 am

Re: Francis Darroze 1991 Domaine de Dupont

Postby numen » Tue Sep 04, 2012 11:53 pm

Hm, tough for me to say. My 'soft' cut off is a bit older than most - around 30 years - but that's also taking various factors into account. I'm starting to think that terroir makes a huge difference in the general quality (or at least flavor profile) along with the grape varietals. I'm checking into it with at least one village (La Freche) because I really adore the profile. Of those from La Freche that I've had (e.g. Salie and Coquillon), most have been in the 29-33 year range. I've had some in the 18-20 range. The younger ones tended to be lighter - same flavors in the background - but not dark, hearty, and full as their older counterparts, almost as though the older ones had thickened a bit.

Having said that, I've had 30-40+ year old armagancs from other areas that were lighter and full of that over-oaked citrus/tannic/wood flavor, and more away from the fruit, nuts, and spice characteristics.

So, my safe range, for my preferences, is probably between 25-30, but I'm taking a chance on a few just over 30 because they're from this one village. The 33 year old Coquillon that I reviewed had just the right amount of wood, though it was clearly growing. Any more and it'd be too much, but it's got less noticeable wood than most whisky of that age.

You prefer the 15-20 year range, right?


Return to “Armagnac Reviews and descriptions”