Tesseron Lot 29

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numen
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Tesseron Lot 29

Postby numen » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:20 am

Ok, I decided to do my other Tesseron tonight. Next time I'll do another Bouju or my remaining Beaulon (vintage), or an Armagnac. As a tip of the hat to BSinKY, here's one of the Glencairn to do the trick!

lot 29 for the forum.jpg
lot 29 for the forum.jpg (103.84 KiB) Viewed 4991 times


Nose: Aromatic when opening the bottle, more fresh plums, prunes, and figs, along with the sweet tobacco leaf of lovely age. In the glass, it takes time. It's disturbingly mute at first, but opens up after a few minutes. This is not something to pop and pour. It's pour and wait a bit. As it opens, though, the nose is really magical. Candied almonds (the type that has the thick syrup that runs across many almonds), marshmallow, rich marzipan, fat walnuts, roasted chestnuts -- well, you get the point. More on the brown, nuts, and sweet, dry stuff.

Palate: I'm pretty sure that this is water. It feels very much like water on the palate, and it's not until I've swallowed and oxygen enters that I know that it's not. Some stewed pecan and almonds, creme brulee, maybe the rind of dried fig, and very small amount of sprinkled cocoa.

Finish: Medium length, though a hair shorter than the 53. Again, it's very high on the nuts, burned sugar, and some of the same orange zest, though clearly more aged than it was in the 53. Less overt wood on the finish, and a smidge more rancio. 93-4 points, it seems. (Nose: 24-5, Palate: 22, Finish: 22.5, Balance: 24.5)

The actual nose of this is 25 points, but I'm split on docking it a little over the extreme dumb phase it enters when first in glass. Though, maybe it's just the spirit's way of saying, "Slow down; don't pour and chug me. Take time and enjoy this." The flavors are all exceptional, and the balance is superb. The only weakness in it is the strength. The balance is through the roof, though I'm not comfortable giving it a 25 for that based on the ethereal nature of it (borrowing a turn from Parker). Admittedly, the total points only matter if you put equal value on everything (who does?), but it's a reference point, I suppose. The price for this is all over the place. I got it for $250 on sale a few years ago, though then, as now, the price tended to hover around $400. It's really good. Is it worth $250 or even 400? That depends. I've spent more on whiskies that I've enjoyed less, and even the same for cognacs. I do appreciate the Tesseron house, and they do some fantastic things. Getting a bottle of cognac that is about 80 years old for that price is virtually unheard of. So, if you want to try a very well composed older cognac, it's definitely worth your while. There are better cognacs, even by Tesseron, for less, I think, but not with this flavor profile. I wonder whether the strength was a factor of the age of the spirits, or a decision by the cellarmaster. Either way, the flavors have united superbly.

BSinTX
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby BSinTX » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:41 am

Nice glass!


On thing that strikes me about Tesseron is the no nonsense bottling and label. I am a HUGE fan of paying for the contents and not the bottle. I don't know how Beaulon keeps their prices so low as they have beautiful packaging (which gets tossed sooner or later.)

So that being Lot 29, it was distilled in 1929? If so, I'd say $400 would be a great price for a product that old. Are you finding that the older bottlings begin to lose out after so many years in the barrel?

numen
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby numen » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:54 am

The Tesseron label system really is beautiful in its simplicity, and I adore the ancient glass for the bottles.

I *believe* that it means that it was predominantly from 1929, and blended with older stock, too. I keep thinking that it was supposed to be Lot year as the youngest distillate in the bottle, but am struggling to find the confirmation for it. Yep, Tesseron really is a steal all across the board. I hate using the term 'bargain' because that implies maybe forsaking some quality for a lower price, but it's really just boggling how low the prices are relative to the quality and rarity. The Extreme, for instance, is a blend of 10 barrels from 1853-1906. $3,500. Not inexpensive, but it's also a 1.5l bottle - so, effectively, $1,750/750ml. In the realm of pre-phylloxera wine, that's ridiculous. They probably can keep costs relatively low because of their extensive store of distillate and that they grow their own grapes and produce everything themselves. I've had some Pontet Canet wines, too, from the Tesserons, and I can only say that they are fanatical in their devotion to quality.

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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby bobt » Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:24 pm

I find that I like my Lot 29 more and more each time I sip it. I have had to put in the effort to get to know this cognac; it doesn't reveal its charms to the casual, one-time visitor. Regarding finish: does anyone else get a blast of marzipan?

numen
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby numen » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:42 pm

I got that on the nose, but the kind of sweetened almond/nougat element persisted on the palate and finish for me as well

hedonist
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About Tesseron Lot 29

Postby hedonist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:26 am

Yes, you are right about a lot of things, numen. Due to the fact that it's forbidden by french law to put a vintage mark on a cognac bottle that's not been strictly controlled by BNIC (Bureau National Interprofessionnel du Cognac), Tesseron use this "Lot" mark to give the customers a hint of the contents age. As you wrote, most of the brandy in the cognac blend Lot 29, the backbone, is from 1929. I have read that the two other brandys in the blend are from astonishing 1905 and/or 1906.

Myself have bought and taste the Lot 29 and Lot 53. Both are truly excellent cognacs, but not my favourites. It's a special feeling though, to drink something from so long back that you know that all people involved in making this are long gone. It's like taking a sip of history.

Another interesting fact about Tesseron, is that the brand often is pointed out to be Britain's late primeminister, Winston Churchill's, favourite cognac. The mythology says that Churchill (who was a heavily drinker) as often as he could, visited the legendary Savoy Hotel to enjoy the hotel's house brand Tesseron. Probably he also took the opportunity to have a bottle of his favourite Champagne, Pol Roger, in his preferable vintage 1947.

bobt
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby bobt » Thu Oct 17, 2013 7:30 pm

I'm very interested in that 1905/1906 dating possibility, on the other parts of the blend. Very nice, it it is true!

hedonist
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby hedonist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:15 pm

Yes, there are some different bids out there about the age of the eau de vie in the Lot 29 blend :)

A quick web-search shows: The Swedish importers LWM Wine and Bibendum tells us that Lot 29 contains spirits "from 1906 to 1930". Thats also the opinion of the Ukraine bar and cognac shop "Cognacotheque". International Fine Wines are more accurate in their description and and writes that "5% of the blend comes from 1905" http://www.internationalfinewines.com.a ... 700ml.html
Yet another wine firm says that "30% of the blend is from 1906" http://vintuswines.com/estates/cognac_t ... _exception

Myself i have read, many years ago, that Lot 29 only had three different eau de vie in its blend. But who really knows? This is what cognac is all about; mystery and rumors, trying to build up the expectations.

Actually, i don't really think the Tesseron Lot 29 is worth the money. The cheaper Lot 53 have more character but still to expensive. But if i had that kind of money to spend and a lot of brands to choose from, i probably had bought something like Jean Fillioux Reserve Familliale, Chateau de Beaulon vintage 1975, Normandin-Mercier vintage 1976, Paul Giraud XO Héritage or the much cheaper but outstanding, really hardcore, non diluted Florilège No 45 from Ragnaud-Sabourin.
Last edited by hedonist on Fri Oct 18, 2013 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bobt
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby bobt » Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:30 pm

Thanks for posting the links, interesting reading.

Pierre
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Re: Tesseron Lot 29

Postby Pierre » Fri Oct 18, 2013 5:36 pm

I'm also curious to try some Jean Fillioux products, I think I'll have a go at their Très Vieux or their Cigare Club. There's also a special reserve sold here in Italy: 40 years old and 50% ABV, but priced around 180€, it's a bit expensive but really tempting !


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